Policy Paper

The Academics for Refugees Policy Paper calls for A Just and Humane Approach for Refugees.  It makes a numbers of recommendations that are supported by sound scholarly research. Visit the post for more. Source: Policy Paper

A breakthrough in the search for indicators of child risk

A recent piece of research we completed in partnership between our Jack Brockhoff Child Health and Wellbeing Program and the Victorian Department of Education and Training has revealed a breakthrough in the search for risk indicators of child developmental, emotional and … Continue reading

Reblog: Separation during disasters may have a lasting impact, even when there’s a happy ending

Originally posted on International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Blog Posted 12 January 2016 by Colin Gallagher, PhD and Karen Block, PhD A compelling footnote to the recent Paris attacks was Facebook’s activation of its “Safety check” feature, which encouraged … Continue reading

Ethics Approval and Researcher Training for Victorian Data Collection

Dr Karen Block, who is a Research Fellow in our team, has been doing some excellent work with the project ASPIRE: Analysing Safety and Place in Immigrant and Refugee Experience. Keep up with their research by following their blog here.

ASPIRE

We began September with our second Victorian Advisory Group meeting, which gave us an opportunity to reflect on the progress of the project so far and workshop recruitment strategies for interviews and focus groups in our key research sites.

August was a particularly productive month for the research team. Not only did we submit our State of Knowledge paper to ANROWS for publication, we also received ethics clearance from the University of Melbourne Health Sciences Human Ethics Sub-Committee. This means we can now begin interviewing in Victoria (and hopefully soon Tasmania)!

IMG_1518On 25-26 August we conducted our first researcher training with members of the research team and bilingual educators from Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health. The two-day training included a great presentation from InTouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence and was led by Dr Cathy Vaughan and ASPIRE research assistant Erin Davis, who provided the perfect combination of expertise in…

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Developing and Evaluating Complex Interventions 5-day training course – registrations open!

Introducing a brand new 5-day intensive training course, run by our team from Public Health Insight and colleagues from DECIPHer from Cardiff University. Register for this training course here: http://ecommerce.mdhs.unimelb.edu.au/product.asp?pID=258&cID=89&c=24346

Children and Youth with Obesity—a growing global epidemic

Cochrane Child Health

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According to the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC), obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the last 30 years.1 In 2012, more than a third of children and adolescents in the US were overweight or obese.1 Obesity is not limited to developed countries or older children, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that in 2013, 42 million children under the age of 5 years were overweight and close to 31 million of these children were living in developing countries.2 The global nature and steady increase has led the WHO to declare childhood obesity as “one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century.”2

Obesity can have wide ranging effects both in the short-term and long-term. In the short term, it can affect social, psychological and physical health. For example, children and adolescents with obesity are more…

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The Teeth Tales Showcase: The Finale to an 8 year community-based oral health research study

Written by Research Fellow Dana Young

My role for the most part of the last 4 years has been implementing a child oral health promotion intervention for children from a migrant and refugee background, also known as Teeth Tales. Although the inception of the project began many years before my involvement, I was involved with rolling out the exploratory trial phase of study.

The idea for the Teeth Tales research study arose in 2006 due to community concerns for the oral health of children from a refugee or migrant background residing in the Moreland and Hume local government areas (LGAs) of Melbourne. From this a PhD study(1) exploring the sociocultural influences on oral health was developed and conducted in partnership with Arabic Welfare, Victoria Arabic Social Services and Pakistani Australia Association of Melbourne to discuss these issues with mothers from a Lebanese, Iraqi and Pakistani background. Based on the findings from this initial work the next phase of Teeth Tales was designed and piloted to explore the implementation of a community based child oral health promotion intervention for children from a migrant and refugee background (2). For more background information about the Teeth Tales study visit out website here.

The Teeth Tales study has been an 8 year project led in partnership between Merri Community Health (MCHS) and The University of Melbourne and was culminated through a showcase on the 23rd of October 2014. This half day event involved members of the key partner agencies involved in the project, which alongside MCHS and the University of Melbourne include Dental Health Services Victoria, Moreland City Council, Arabic Welfare, Victorian Arabic Social Services, Pakistani Australia Association of Melbourne, The Centre for Culture, Ethnicity and Health and North Richmond Community Health Service. Key findings from the research were presented and representatives from the partner organisations presented their experiences and learnings associated with being involved in the Teeth Tales study.

Mandy Truong presenting at the Teeth Tales Showcase October 2014

Mandy Truong presenting at the Teeth Tales Showcase October 2014

This research project provided 667 children with a community based dental screening. For many children this was the first time they had seen a dental professional. Twelve percent of these children were referred on for further treatment at a dental clinic. Parents allocated to the intervention group received education from trained peer educators around the Dental Health Services Victoria key oral health messages of ‘Eat Well, Drink Well, Clean Well and Stay Well’. Based on earlier findings the discussion of traditional oral health practices was incorporated into the peer education oral health course. Results indicate the Teeth Tales intervention increased the oral hygiene practices of the participants, which is very important for the prevention of oral health problems.

Outcomes from the Teeth Tales study were applicable for not only the families involved as study participants but also for the multiple partner organisations involved. Working in partnership with established cultural organisations is critical to health promotion initiatives for families with migrant and refugee backgrounds. The Teeth Tales showcase was an exhibit of the wonderfully strong organisational partnerships that have been created and maintained over the life of the project and how involvement in the project has forged links between the local organisations and potential clients in the community. There was unanimous feedback from the partner organisations that this project had provided them with an opportunity to promote additional health and social service support to participants. Data collection sessions, where children received a free dental screening, were seen as an ideal opportunity to provide this information. One organisation arranged for families to attend appointments at the time data collection sessions were being run to alleviate travel demands on the families to their organisation. Findings from the study will also contribute to the updated Dental Health Services Victoria clinical guidelines for dental clinicians and maternal child health nurses.

It has been extremely rewarding working as a researcher involved with this study. I have developed my skills working with culturally diverse communities in a culturally appropriate manner, undertaken community and stakeholder engagement and liaised between participants and local services; whilst also witnessing the capacity of the cultural partner organisations grow to promote preventative health messages and to be able to aid migrant families to navigate the community health sector. Links have been created between culturally specific social services organisations, community health and the child and family services at local council – which will be of ongoing benefit for newly arrived families trying to access a multitude of services for their family.

For access to resources developed for the Teeth Tales study please visit the relevant organisations websites.

  • The Teeth Tales Peer Education Manual includes class materials for child oral health peer education trainers. You can access it from the Merri Community Health Services Website http://mchs.org.au/research-partnerships/latest-research. For more information, email Maryanne Tadic at maryannet@mchs.org.au
  • The Cultural Competency Organisational Review (CORe) Tool documents will be available via the The Centre for Culture, Ethnicity and Health website soon at ceh.org.au

References:

  1. Riggs E. Addressing child oral health inequalities in refugee and migrant communities. 2010.
  2. Gibbs L, Waters E, de Silva A, Riggs E, Moore L, Armit C, et al. An exploratory trial implementing a community-based child oral health promotion intervention for Australian families from refugee and migrant backgrounds: a protocol paper for Teeth Tales. BMJ open. 2014; 4 (3): e004260.

Our First Beyond Bushfires Symposium

The Beyond Bushfires Symposium was an all-day event held at the University of Melbourne on the 30th October, 2014. It provided an opportunity for the study investigators to present and discuss our preliminary findings with participants and community members as well as service providers and representatives from government. I really valued the engagement leading up to the event, on the day and the feedback that we received afterwards. Leading up to the big day there was so much interest, and with the 140 seat room booked out we had many people discuss their interest in the study and perspectives on the findings.

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Professor Elizabeth Waters introduces the academic team at the Beyond Bushfires Symposium October 2014

We had a full agenda that included presentations on social networks, diverse responses and reactions, couples, families and children, psychological outcomes, anger, bereavement, relocation, and separation during and immediately after the fires. The day was packed with information that was quite overwhelming in terms of scope and depth. The surveys gave a sense of the extent and pattern of impacts on individuals and communities, and the in-depth interviews gave a sense of the personal and individual experiences that people went through. Lesley Bebbington, local resident and youth worker, shared her heartfelt, emotional and extremely personal journey over the last five years. We felt that hearing from someone who had personally experienced the bushfires gave an insight into the impacts it has on one person’s life before we went on to discuss the broader, population impacts of the bushfires.

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Full house at the Beyond Bushfires Symposium October 2014

The Symposium brought together study partners and community members to discuss their views on the research and its importance for everyone involved. This dialogue provided an insight into the extraordinary input by multiple parties throughout the study, including consultations with community members/groups, local and state service providers and government departments from planning and designing the study, to interpreting results. The large contribution to discussions and debates regarding different aspects of our findings was incredible and really fulfilled our aim for the day. You could feel the passion and emotions being expressed from those who our findings have direct influence on. The interactive sessions provided great insight into future directions and issues of interest to local bushfire affected communities.

Some people within the audience were interested in the study methods and conclusions and who was involved in forming these conclusions. Additionally, there were discussions around what we hadn’t included within the study and we acknowledge that we couldn’t include everything and we had difficulties in making decisions regarding inclusions. But there is a large amount of research being undertaken in this area, and we hope that others can cover the important components that are beyond the scope of our study.

A few community members were worried about their emotions and possible distress that could result, and showed great courage in attending the day. I’m so glad these people attended after their contributions to our study, the symposium gave us a chance to feedback our findings and get responses and inputs for future considerations. The Symposium was also a chance for us to thank everyone who has supported the research, and gave us an avenue to share bushfires experiences, and learnings to inform service providers and state level organisations.

Associate Professor Lou Harms presenting at the Beyond Bushfires Symposium October 2014.

Associate Professor Lou Harms presenting at the Beyond Bushfires Symposium October 2014.

If you would like to keep informed of the research, please email info-beyondbushfires@unimelb.edu.au with the subject line “Add to mailing list” and you will receive updates on our project, including access to the presentations on the day, once they become available. Additionally, visit our website to access the latest findings and publications www.beyondbushfires.org.au